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How do I Know if My Writing is Improving - Hey Onicia

Hey, Onicia!

So, I have been using Hemingway app for editing for some time. It has helped me get a lot together. But I can’t help but to notice, when I put a published pieced from a well respected writer that it is all kinds of mark-ups. Which app do you use, if you use one at all?

I hear all the time to learn the rules then break them, but then I think there are so many rules to learn, lawd Jesus. I feel like I never will know all the rules, but I won’t give up.

Hey Onicia is a series where I tap into my type-A side and answer questions from my friends about this starving artist life. These posts might contain affiliate links; at no cost to you, I might earn a commission when you make a purchase. If you find this helpful, share with your twitter homies or thank me with ice cream. Want to pick my brain? Holla at me! 

Hey, Iris!

Yes, writing is an art. The rules are suggestions. So, learn the rules and then break them.
Hemmingway helped me be concise. Especially when writing for children.

I've had a Grammarly subscription for almost 4 years now. Grammarly is not perfect and can miss contextual errors. It doesn't understand slang or human-speak.

I use Merriam-Webster every day to confirm spelling, definitions, and alternative words.

Grammar Girl is my fave resource for learning the rules.

Google Docs voice typing is a powerful voice-to-text tool. Perfect for when you can't get your fingers to move as fast as your mind.

As you've seen with the Hemmingway app, respected authors have plenty of "mistakes" that went unnoticed by you. Measure your writing by influence, not by some arbituary grammar score.

How to tell if your writing is improving

  • Do I feel more confident while writing?
  • Am I writing faster?
  • Do I cringe less when I re-read my work?
  • Are people responding to my call to actions?
  • Am I getting more shares, comments, or generating a discussion?
  • Am I landing more clients?
Basically, is your writing bringing you closer to your goals or are you in the same position?



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